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Browse Prior Art Database

Backlash Free Drive

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000076934D
Original Publication Date: 1972-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gunther, TA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The elimination of backlash in drive systems is important in low friction X-Y positioning tables. One inexpensive approach which eliminates backlash is illustrated. A frame 10 formed in a square to define a cavity 11 therein includes a plurality of shafts 12, 13, 14, and 15, which are rotatably mounted in bushings 16, 17, 18, and 19, respectively, with each of the shafts being positioned at right angles at its adjacent shaft. At the inner terminal end of each of the shafts is mounted a frustoconical drive member 20, 21, 22, and 23, each of the drive members engaging the drive member mounted on the terminal end of adjacent shafts.

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Backlash Free Drive

The elimination of backlash in drive systems is important in low friction X-Y positioning tables. One inexpensive approach which eliminates backlash is illustrated. A frame 10 formed in a square to define a cavity 11 therein includes a plurality of shafts 12, 13, 14, and 15, which are rotatably mounted in bushings 16, 17, 18, and 19, respectively, with each of the shafts being positioned at right angles at its adjacent shaft. At the inner terminal end of each of the shafts is mounted a frustoconical drive member 20, 21, 22, and 23, each of the drive members engaging the drive member mounted on the terminal end of adjacent shafts. In order to maintain firm engagement of the drive members, with the adjacent drive members, a spring elements 24, 25, 26 and 27, respectively, biases the drivers one against the other, the biasing force of the springs being chosen for the particular system forces encountered.

Transmitted motion may be taken from any of the shafts, for example the shaft 15, the motion and power transfer in the particular instance being illustrated as being at a right angle vis-a-vis the shafts 12 and 15.

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