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Organic Developer for Positive Photoresists

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000076945D
Original Publication Date: 1972-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

MacIntyre, MW: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

An aliphatic alcohol containing from about 4 to about 10 carbon atoms may be employed in place of the conventional alkali phosphates and silicates as developers for positive photoresists, such as Shipley AZ*-1350 photoresist, identified as an m-cresol formaldehyde novolak resin sensitized with a diazo ketone identified as the 4'-2'-3'-dihydroxybenzophenone ester of 1-oxo-2-diazonaphthalene-5-sulfonic acid. Suitable specific examples of the alcohol developers include iso-amyl alcohol, tertiary amyl alcohol, and n-octyl alcohol. The photoresist may be applied in the conventional manner to conventional thicknesses and exposed under conventional conditions.

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Organic Developer for Positive Photoresists

An aliphatic alcohol containing from about 4 to about 10 carbon atoms may be employed in place of the conventional alkali phosphates and silicates as developers for positive photoresists, such as Shipley AZ*-1350 photoresist, identified as an m-cresol formaldehyde novolak resin sensitized with a diazo ketone identified as the 4'-2'-3'-dihydroxybenzophenone ester of 1-oxo-2- diazonaphthalene-5-sulfonic acid. Suitable specific examples of the alcohol developers include iso-amyl alcohol, tertiary amyl alcohol, and n-octyl alcohol. The photoresist may be applied in the conventional manner to conventional thicknesses and exposed under conventional conditions.

Particularly preferred is iso-amyl alcohol, which has been found to degrade resist-SiO(2) adhesion much less than conventional developers, thus reducing the need for adhesion promoters. Additionally, iso-amyl alcohol is several times faster than the usual phosphate or silicate developers. * Trademark, Azoplate Corporation, Murray Hill, New Jersey.

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