Browse Prior Art Database

Computer Control

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000076992D
Original Publication Date: 1972-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 30K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Schuenemann, C: AUTHOR

Abstract

For the design of computer function controls high-density read-only memory (ROM) storage chips can be used. But due to their instruction pattern which includes machine instructions consisting of differing numbers of function control words, function controls are highly redundant and sensitive to changes, so that they should be implemented as Read)Write (R/W) stores.

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Computer Control

For the design of computer function controls high-density read-only memory (ROM) storage chips can be used. But due to their instruction pattern which includes machine instructions consisting of differing numbers of function control words, function controls are highly redundant and sensitive to changes, so that they should be implemented as Read)Write (R/W) stores.

As shown in the figure, both types of store are combined to form a common high-density function control store of adequate flexibility with respect to changes. The ROM part is occupied by the functional control words. The R/W part, designed as an associative store, initially serves as a standby and later accommodates the instruction words to be changed in random-address sequence. If a function control word is over-written in the ROM store by a word of the same address in the R/W store, the ROM word is automatically blocked off via AND gate C controlled, via an answer-back signal on line Is, by the associative store whose speeds are essentially above those of the R/W store.

The operation code of the machine-instruction word Ii invokes as address information, the function control store. Further address information is derived from the clock that successively generates clock pulses T1 to T16. In this manner the various word positions of a machine instruction are invoked, one after the other.

Each instruction Ii thus comprises up to 16 function control words which are invoked by T1 to T16. O...