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Browse Prior Art Database

Beam Director with Independent Adjustments

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000077006D
Original Publication Date: 1972-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 32K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Harrison, RW: AUTHOR

Abstract

This device allows a narrow collimated beam (e.g. a laser beam) to be precisely aligned for coincidence, in angle and position, with a desired line. This is done without moving the source; the four coordinates have noninteracting adjustments.

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Beam Director with Independent Adjustments

This device allows a narrow collimated beam (e.g. a laser beam) to be precisely aligned for coincidence, in angle and position, with a desired line. This is done without moving the source; the four coordinates have noninteracting adjustments.

In Fig. 1, the two lenses, L1 and L2, are separated by the sum of their focal lengths, f(1) + f(2), as for a telescope. They are laterally displaced from the axis of the incoming beam by the distances x(1) and x(2) (showing only displacements in the plane of the paper for convenience). The emerging beam is collimated. It leaves L2 at the height X from the original axis and at an angle proportional to this axis, where: X = x(1) (f(1) + f(2)) over f(1) and proportional to = x(2) - x(1) over f(2) (proportional <<1). It is seen that when lens L2 is translated in the lateral plane the angle of emergence, alone, is controlled, in two directions. Also when lenses L1 and L2 are translated together laterally, the position of emergence, alone, is controlled in two dimensions. [The beam diameter is magnified to choice by selecting the ratio M = f(2)/f(1)].

A more compact form, shown in Fig. 2, is achieved by using a Galilean arrangement, where L1 is a negative lens. The same formulas hold (replacing f(1) with -f(1)) and the same lens motions are to be implemented [Here M >1].

Another design employs plano-concave and convex elements of focal lengths and thickness to allow the arrangement shown...