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Browse Prior Art Database

Holographic Security Key

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000077016D
Original Publication Date: 1972-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 3 page(s) / 71K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Krewson, NN: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In current and emerging data-processing systems, the large data base requirements are to control the access, audit, etc., of users into the data and to allow the correct use, update, and publication of the data. A compact, versatile holographic key 1 and associated receptacle 6 provide system security and user control. The holo-key 1 includes a window 2 and a reflective hologram 3. Associated with the receptacle 6 are a single-light source 7 and a single light sensor array 8.

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Holographic Security Key

In current and emerging data-processing systems, the large data base requirements are to control the access, audit, etc., of users into the data and to allow the correct use, update, and publication of the data. A compact, versatile holographic key 1 and associated receptacle 6 provide system security and user control. The holo-key 1 includes a window 2 and a reflective hologram 3. Associated with the receptacle 6 are a single-light source 7 and a single light sensor array 8.

The design and code structure provides enhanced security and storage to extend the functional ability of the device. The holo-key is interactively coded with the true owner so that use by interlopers is prevented if the holo-key is lost or stolen.

The storage capability is increased by providing additional hologram images. The holo-key and receptacle are made so that it can be inserted and rotated to any of a number of discrete positions, e.g. 12. Twelve discrete holograms are prerecorded on the holo-key. They are individually selected for readout through the rotational position of the holo-key.

The additional rotational key orientations not only provide for an expansion in storage capacity, but also for an additional level of security in an interactive manner.

The information (holograms) are coded in a sequence such that the true owner of the key is required to place the key in a certain position and then, in sequence, turn to any of a number of positions in a prearranged order. USER SYSTEM 1) Inserts in 7 Acknowledges, Signals Proceed 2) Turn to 1 Acknowledges, Signals Proceed 3) Turn to 5 Acknowledges, Signals Proceed 4) Turn to 3 Acknowledges, Signals Proceed.

User "A" would use the above sequence at certain times of the day, days of the month, etc., and at other times a completely different sequence.

User "B" would use different sequences or even the same sequences as user "A". In the latter case, they would mean something entirely different to the system, due to the information coded in the Key and the user's identification and interactive answers that would be exchanged the controller/system. These sequences could be provided through keyboard operation as well as the rotation of the holo-key in this example.

The important concept is that the user, the key and the controller/ system are locked interactively together in such a way that information flow is dependent on certain action and information from each of them in combination. The access to the system cannot be breached by copying data from the key, or the system, or a procedure cycle from a user.

The proper initial holo-key insertion position and rotation sequence are the first two levels of security screening and data transfer selection.

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When the...