Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Method for removing hidden information from images

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000077159D
Publication Date: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 3 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for removing hidden information from images. Benefits include improved functionality and improved security.

This text was extracted from a Microsoft Word document.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 54% of the total text.

Method for removing hidden information from images

Disclosed is a method for removing hidden information from images. Benefits include improved functionality and improved security.

Background

              Hidden data that is not readily apparent to a viewer may be contained in an image by manipulation of the least significant bits (LSBs) in the file. This technique is called steganography. Manipulation of the LSBs has minimal impact on the image perceived by the naked eye. For example, a terrorist leader could hide information in the image of an item for sale in an on-line auction. A terrorist could view the item for sale, extract the hidden message, and instruct the members of a terrorist cell what to do. Speculation has implied that steganography may have been used in planning the September 11, 2001 attack on the

World

Trade

Center

.

              A buffer overflow exploit is identified with scripting and image processing. For example, active exploits that can cause denial of service attacks involving system crashes are available on the Internet. Buffer overflow attacks rely on specifically constructed code for a target vulnerability. Minor changes to the exploited code render it ineffective.

Description

              The disclosed method is the modification of image LSBs to make hidden data useless.

A software component randomly modifies the LSBs at the time of viewing. Another software component permanently modifies the LSBs of stored images (see Figures 1 and 2).

              Modifying image LSBs results in little overhead and little or no perceived change to the actual images.

              The disclosed method effectively renders clear/encrypted steganography and image buffer overflow exploits ineffective by overwriting the original hidden data/buffer overflow. Organizations that publicly host images on the Internet can use th...