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The virtual touch pad on the touch screen for allowing a precise pointer control

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000077230D
Original Publication Date: 2005-Feb-25
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 16K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Disclosed is a software program that supports different input modes on a touch screen, depending on the area where a finger touches. Typically, when a finger touches a touch screen, the mouse pointer jumps to the point where the finger touches and, depending on the setting of the input mode, a click event of the mouse left/right button is generated successively. This input mode can be changed, but the selected mode is applied to the whole area of the touch screen. i.e. plural input modes cannot be assigned on the touch screen at the same time. The Input Control Software described in this document supports multiple input modes at the same time on the touch screen, by defining the area on the touch screen, assigning the input mode to each area separately, introducing a module to hook the mouse events and control them.

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The virtual touch pad on the touch screen for allowing a precise pointer control

As shown on Figure-1, create a window as area A on the desktop. And assign the input modes as follows:

Desktop: Move the mouse pointer to the point where the finger touches (Absolute Mode), and generate a single click event of the mouse left button.

Area A: Move the mouse pointer from the current position according to the amount of the finger's movement on the touch screen (Relative Mode) without generating any click events.

Figure-1

On Figure-2, if a finger touches on the point "b'," when the mouse pointer is located on the point "a'," the mouse pointer jumps to the point "b'," and a left click event is generated successively. This behavior is supported by the touch screen software (driver or firmware).

But if the finger touches the point "a" on the area A when the mouse pointer is located on the point "a'," the Input Control Software will detect the events of pointer movement and a left mouse click, but discard them so that any other software doesn't receive these events. Instead, it checks the x, y-coordination of the point "a." Then, if the finger moves to the point "b," the Input Control Software will detect the events of pointer movement and a left mouse click, but discard them so that any other software doesn't receive these events. Instead, it checks the x, y-coordination of the point "b," and calculate the delta of the points "a" and "b," and move the mouse pointer to the co...