Browse Prior Art Database

Generating Synchronized Pairs of Q Switched Laser Pulses

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000077235D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 30K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Culver, WH: AUTHOR

Abstract

In situations where it is desired to generate double pulses from a Q-switched laser system, one technique is to prevent all of the energy from being released in the first pulse, or by pulsing before the end of the pump period so that the gain builds back up for another pulse. Another technique has been to use two lasers which are timed to generate radiation at different times. However, neither of these techniques has been successful in obtaining synchronization to within a nanosecond.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 59% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Generating Synchronized Pairs of Q Switched Laser Pulses

In situations where it is desired to generate double pulses from a Q-switched laser system, one technique is to prevent all of the energy from being released in the first pulse, or by pulsing before the end of the pump period so that the gain builds back up for another pulse. Another technique has been to use two lasers which are timed to generate radiation at different times. However, neither of these techniques has been successful in obtaining synchronization to within a nanosecond.

One technique to achieve accurate synchronization of pulses having a spacing of around one nanosecond apart is illustrated in the figures. In Fig. 1, lasers 2 and 3 are Q-switched by an appropriate saturable absorber disposed in cavities 4 and 5, respectively. As shown in Fig. 2, which is taken along the line 2-2 of Fig. 1, the lasers are disposed in a double-elliptical cavity 10 and are pumped by flash lamp 8. The cavity parameters with respect to either laser 2 or 3 are constructed so that one laser tends to fire somewhat earlier than the other one, say 100 nanoseconds earlier. Because they are both pumped by the same flash lamp, they will tend to maintain approximately the same delay. To obtain synchronization between the two pulses, a portion of the output of laser 2, which fires first, is transmitted through a coil of a fiber-optic guide 9 which delays the pulse for some definite length of time. The output of the fiber co...