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Resistor Tracking on Monolithic Integrated Circuits

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000077287D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Battista, MA: AUTHOR [+6]

Abstract

In the fabrication of semiconductor integrated circuits by techniques in which the masks used in the fabrication are generated automatically by a programmed light table, it has been found that resistors which require maximum "tracking" or consistency with respect to each other should be arranged parallel to each other in the integrated circuit chip.

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Resistor Tracking on Monolithic Integrated Circuits

In the fabrication of semiconductor integrated circuits by techniques in which the masks used in the fabrication are generated automatically by a programmed light table, it has been found that resistors which require maximum "tracking" or consistency with respect to each other should be arranged parallel to each other in the integrated circuit chip.

In the fabrication of integrated circuits, the various processing steps involve the exposure to light of the semiconductor substrate coded with a light-sensitive photoresist sequentially through a series of masks. These masks are usually formed on glass or plastic surfaces or in metal sheets. The particular geometry of each mask will determine the photoresist pattern adhering to the substrate during each particular processing step and, consequently, will determine the pattern of the impurity diffusion, metallurgy applied or insulative material applied during a particular processing step.

With the trend towards automation in the fabrication of integrated circuits, it has become a conventional practice to generate the masks required for the various processing steps by a programmed light table as described, for example, in "Automatic Artwork Generation for Large Scale Integration", Cook et al., IEEE Journal of Solid State Circuits, Volume Sc-2, No. 4, December 1967. This automated light table generation technique involves the formation of masks by creating transparent o...