Browse Prior Art Database

Beam Accessed Chip File

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000077327D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Garwin, RL: AUTHOR

Abstract

One of the difficulties of large-scale storage systems using a beam addressable magneto-optic chip file arrangement, resides in the fact that full use is not made of the demonstrated writing and reading data rats. The single laser write-read arrangement shown in Fig. 1 is designed to make full use of this data rate in a simple and effective manner.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 53% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Beam Accessed Chip File

One of the difficulties of large-scale storage systems using a beam addressable magneto-optic chip file arrangement, resides in the fact that full use is not made of the demonstrated writing and reading data rats. The single laser write-read arrangement shown in Fig. 1 is designed to make full use of this data rate in a simple and effective manner.

As shown in Fig. 1. the data is recorded on the magneto-optic medium of chip 1 in a direction transverse to the direction of motion of the chip, as shown by the arrow. Thus, the data is arranged in a track, generally designated by reference character 3, which is about 0.25 cm. wide and 10 cm. long, with the data recorded as if by a rotating magnetic head transverse to the length of the track.

Fig. 2 shows a multiple track arrangement, with each data track having associated therewith a servo track. Although eight tracks are shown, it is clear that more or less may be used. As shown in Fig. 1, a single laser 5, such as a gallium-arsenide laser, is provided with an acoustic deflector 7. Deflector 7 makes a repetitive sweep, via an fm chirp, for example. Typically, the bit size may be 5 microns, which can be adequately obtained with conventional lenses across a 2.5 mm field of view using the field flattener 9, if required. An external air supply may be employed to force chip 1 against the field flattener, and to provide an air bearing at that point, if desired. As the acoustic deflector deflects the beam continuously across the chip at, for example, a 2 x...