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Acceleration Deformable Recordings

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000077366D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Marinace, JC: AUTHOR

Abstract

The recording of information by physical deformation of material includes phonographic recording and thermoplastic recording. The former utilizes the displacement of a stylus to deform a recording medium of soft material, while the latter utilizes electrostatic charge and heat to deform a thermoplastic recording medium.

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Acceleration Deformable Recordings

The recording of information by physical deformation of material includes phonographic recording and thermoplastic recording. The former utilizes the displacement of a stylus to deform a recording medium of soft material, while the latter utilizes electrostatic charge and heat to deform a thermoplastic recording medium.

As described here, heat and acceleration are utilized to deform a recording medium of relatively low-melting point. To achieve this end, a recording disk is employed having a recording film deposited thereon, preferably in a band near the periphery, as is done on magnetic recording disks. The recording film comprises a material exhibiting a relatively low-melting point, as well as a low- vapor pressure and low-surface tension relative to air. In addition, the recording film material exhibits little chemical reactivity. Typically, the film comprises an eutectic mixture of indium and tin, which has a melting point of 117 degrees C. However, there are a number of other crystalline compounds whose properties are appropriate. Alternatively, noncrystalline materials could likewise be used, provided the viscosities of such materials drop sharply in a reasonable temperature range, such as 100 degrees C to 200 degrees C.

The recording disk is rotated at an angular velocity comparable to that of present-day magnetic recording systems, i.e. approximately 100 revolutions per second. A conventional optical lens arrangement may be emplo...