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Output Control for Ionic Print Head

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000077373D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

McCurry, RE: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Ionic printing devices employing matrix type printing require a large number of individual print elements. Individual wiring of control circuits to each of these elements is very costly and the high density of the elements generates severe physical problems for the packaging involved. The system shown in Fig. 1 can be used to control individual ionic control elements without physically wiring the control elements to the control circuitry.

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Output Control for Ionic Print Head

Ionic printing devices employing matrix type printing require a large number of individual print elements. Individual wiring of control circuits to each of these elements is very costly and the high density of the elements generates severe physical problems for the packaging involved. The system shown in Fig. 1 can be used to control individual ionic control elements without physically wiring the control elements to the control circuitry. In Figure 1, a laser light source indicated at 1 provides a laser beam which is controlled to an on and off state by a suitable optical modulator 2, and then supplied to an optical deflector 3 which is capable of deflecting the beam through a plurality of angles as indicated by the dotted lines, so that the beam can be selectively directed to fall on any one of a plurality of photoconductive ionic elements indicated at 4.

As the beam strikes each of the photoconductive elements, the conduction causes that particular element to supply energy to the associated ionic print device. A conventional circuit configuration for the photoconductive devices is shown in Figure 2. in which element 5 represents a photoconductive transistor, which changes its resistance when light falls upon it, so that the voltage on output lead 7 changes accordingly.

Figure 3 shows one form of physically integrated package for the ionic print elements and their governing photoconductive device. A photoconductive element 5a...