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Reclamation Process for High Voltage Testing Fluid

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000077384D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Anschel, M: AUTHOR

Abstract

In order to prevent arcing or corona discharge during testing, e.g. electrical stressing, of high-voltage power supplies, a high-dielectric strength fluid such as perfluoro-N-methylmorpholine must be utilized. This fluid periodically requires reclamation due to the introduction of contaminants, such as, plasticizers, paraffin oil, fluorides, chlorides (generated residual flux or chlorinated cleaning solvent carryover), water, etc.

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Reclamation Process for High Voltage Testing Fluid

In order to prevent arcing or corona discharge during testing, e.g. electrical stressing, of high-voltage power supplies, a high-dielectric strength fluid such as perfluoro-N-methylmorpholine must be utilized. This fluid periodically requires reclamation due to the introduction of contaminants, such as, plasticizers, paraffin oil, fluorides, chlorides (generated residual flux or chlorinated cleaning solvent carryover), water, etc.

The figure illustrates a scaled-up continuous through-line reclamation process for severely contaminated fluorinated dielectric fluids. Preactivated (overnight at 300 degrees F) 200 mesh fuller's earth powder (~ 500 grams) is placed in a three-inch diameter cylinder 10 in the form of a slurry 12, with dielectric fluid to be purified as the vehicle. A cotton plug 14 is used to retain the fuller's earth in the cylinder and a stopcock to prevent the fuller's earth from drying. A 300 gram anhydrous barium oxide column 16 containing 5 grams of indicating anhydrous calcium sulfate, is placed in line with the fuller's earth column 10 and connected to the receiving can 18. At a pressure of about 30 psi as indicated by the gauge on the pressure tank 20, more than ten gallons of fluid can be purified in one pass, without recharge of filters 10 and 16.

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