Browse Prior Art Database

Spinning Spot Display

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000077395D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bilsback, MS: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In displays providing a limited character capacity of large size dot matrix characters, this requirement may represent an under utilization of the conventional cathode-ray tube display with its large capacity high-power consumption. A mechanical optical apparatus for generating a display of a small number of relatively large size characters is disclosed; representative of this range is 10 to 40 characters spaced along a line 6 to 12 inches in length, with character heights of up to 3/4 inches.

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Spinning Spot Display

In displays providing a limited character capacity of large size dot matrix characters, this requirement may represent an under utilization of the conventional cathode-ray tube display with its large capacity high-power consumption. A mechanical optical apparatus for generating a display of a small number of relatively large size characters is disclosed; representative of this range is 10 to 40 characters spaced along a line 6 to 12 inches in length, with character heights of up to 3/4 inches.

The disclosed apparatus strobes dots on a revolving cylinder of film with a fast light source such as a light-emitting diode (LED). Spaced around the cylinder are a number of frames, each frame containing one dot shaped and spaced as shown in Fig. 1. A 7 x 9 dot matrix character requires 7 frames to pass behind the viewing area for each refresh of the character. As the cylinder rotates, one frame may be strobed several times, thus giving the vertical dimension of the matrix. The character is thus written one vertical slice at a time, proceeding from left to right.

Logic circuitry designed to drive the light-emitting diodes, one per character position, is shown in Fig. 2. A character code is taken from memory 3 and applied to a read-only storage (ROS) 5 containing the slice data for the specified character. For a 7 x 9 dot matrix character, the first of seven bytes containing 9 dot positions is taken from the read-only storage 5, the first dot position tested by ANDing it with the single "one" bit from shift register 7, and the output from logical AND circuit 9 gated through gate circuit 11 and its associated driver...