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Adhering a Metal Film to a Substrate

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000077464D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Stewart, DF: AUTHOR

Abstract

Thin films of metal deposited on metal substrates, by, for example, cold vacuum deposition, often suffer from poor adhesion. Higher temperature deposition results in adhering films, but as substrate temperature is increased so is the possibility of diffusion of the depositing film, reaction of the film and substrate, reaction of the film with the surrounding atmosphere, and warpage of the substrate. Further, heating and cooling problems exist. It is also often difficult to remove high-temperature deposited films.

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Adhering a Metal Film to a Substrate

Thin films of metal deposited on metal substrates, by, for example, cold vacuum deposition, often suffer from poor adhesion. Higher temperature deposition results in adhering films, but as substrate temperature is increased so is the possibility of diffusion of the depositing film, reaction of the film and substrate, reaction of the film with the surrounding atmosphere, and warpage of the substrate. Further, heating and cooling problems exist. It is also often difficult to remove high-temperature deposited films.

Cold vacuum deposited films can be made to adhere to an underlying substrate by subjecting the films to electron-beam bombardment. The The electron-beam power is below that necessary for fusion welding, as no melting or fusion bonding is observed.

In one example, a 500 angstroms layer of Au is cold vacuum deposited upon an aluminum alloy substrate and bombarded with an electron beam of 20 kv, 1 microamp current with a beam diameter of 0.002'', for one minute. The bombarded areas adhere to the substrate and the nonbombarded areas are easily removed, as by wiping. Similar results occur for Co-Ni alloys on aluminum substrates. Thus, this method may be used to generate fine line circuit patterns or magnetic data patterns or tracks upon a substrate. The beam size is controllable into the microinch region, and beam power is adjustable as needed.

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