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Controlled Microscopic Layering During Epitaxial Film Growth to Induce Uniaxial Anisotropy

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000077482D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Giess, EA: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Magnetic garnet films require an induced perpendicular anisotropy in order to produce stable cylindrical magnetic domains. This can be accomplished by forcing the composition of the garnet film to vary periodically through the film thickness. This periodicity in composition will cause a periodic change in lattice spacing through the film thickness. A periodic misfit strain will, therefore, be present and hence, by choosing a garnet composition with the proper magnetostriction, a perpendicular anisotropy can be induced.

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Controlled Microscopic Layering During Epitaxial Film Growth to Induce Uniaxial Anisotropy

Magnetic garnet films require an induced perpendicular anisotropy in order to produce stable cylindrical magnetic domains. This can be accomplished by forcing the composition of the garnet film to vary periodically through the film thickness. This periodicity in composition will cause a periodic change in lattice spacing through the film thickness. A periodic misfit strain will, therefore, be present and hence, by choosing a garnet composition with the proper magnetostriction, a perpendicular anisotropy can be induced.

Two methods can be utilized to obtain the layering described above. The first method of varying the composition with controlled spacings is to electrically pulse the film-melt interface during phase epitaxy liquid-film growth. The Peltier effect causes the growth interface to cool or heat during the electrical pulse so that growth is momentarily arrested. A cyclical growth rate is thereby obtained which results in layers parallel to the substrate surface.

An alternate method is to vibrate the crucible during film growth. The layering in this case will depend on the frequency and amplitude of vibration. With either method, layering in the micrometer to submicrometer ranges can be produced.

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