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Resistance Qualification Test Set for High Density Modules

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000077484D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 24K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bush, RF: AUTHOR

Abstract

The determination of interconnection conductor resistance as presently performed is difficult and time consuming. A convenient method of determining such resistance is provided.

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Resistance Qualification Test Set for High Density Modules

The determination of interconnection conductor resistance as presently performed is difficult and time consuming. A convenient method of determining such resistance is provided.

The test device shown in the figure comprises a transparent substrate 1 having deposited on its under surface, a transparent tin oxide conductive film 2. A permalloy film 3 is disposed on the tin-oxide film. If a small electrical contact is made to the permalloy film, current will pass through the film to the tin-oxide layer. The magnetic field associated with the current will alter the magnetization of the permalloy film in the neighborhood current. The magnitude of the current required to produce a change in magnetization depends on the coercive force of the permalloy film. The change in magnetization can be monitored by a Kerr cell, with light being incident from above, as shown.

In testing the interconnection conductor 4 resistance of a module 5, the module 5 is brought into contact with the permalloy film 3. The conductor 4 under test carries a current to a discrete area of the permalloy film 3 by an exit via 6 when a voltage is applied between the permalloy film 3 and the tin oxide film 2. The voltage is increased and produces a specified magnetic change in the permalloy film 3 at the contact point 6. This change in magnetization is observed via the Kerr cell, not shown. Hence, the current required to yield this change in ma...