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Abrasion Resistant Reflective Coating

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000077485D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bush, RF: AUTHOR

Abstract

In general, plated or evaporated metallic coatings on glass substrates tend to have little or no abrasion resistance. These coatings have an applied use in the field of liquid-crystal display devices, when these are made in the reflective mode. These surfaces have to be prepared by methods involving a certain amount of abrasive treatment and conventional films show severe mechanical deterioration.

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Abrasion Resistant Reflective Coating

In general, plated or evaporated metallic coatings on glass substrates tend to have little or no abrasion resistance. These coatings have an applied use in the field of liquid-crystal display devices, when these are made in the reflective mode. These surfaces have to be prepared by methods involving a certain amount of abrasive treatment and conventional films show severe mechanical deterioration.

This problem is overcome by having the surface more resistant to abrasion and still exhibit a degree of conductivity. This is accomplished by forming a metal-glass substrate by the coevaporation of a suitable metal and glass. Metals such as silver and chromium are compatible with a wide range of glasses and by manipulating the ratios of the evaporants, it is possible to maintain a continuous metal path throughout the film. Oxidation resistance is also exhibited because of the partial glass encapsulation in the procedure. The hardness of the mixture is dependent on the conductivity required. In the above-mentioned liquid-crystal application, this conductivity could be in a range of about 500 to 1000 omega/sq.

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