Browse Prior Art Database

Computer Generation of 3D Pictures

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000077520D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 7 page(s) / 223K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Appel, A: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

It is well known to provide 3-dimensional pictures as book illustrations and novelty greeting cards. In this type of illustration, there can be produced the type wherein the picture changes with the angle of viewing. To provide such pictures, a lenticular lens is bonded to a piece of paper on which a pattern of lines is printed. The pattern consists of sets of parallel lines and each parallel set of lines is offset from each other so that the lens shows only one set at a time. If the sets are different, then the viewer sees a different picture at different angles.

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Computer Generation of 3D Pictures

It is well known to provide 3-dimensional pictures as book illustrations and novelty greeting cards. In this type of illustration, there can be produced the type wherein the picture changes with the angle of viewing. To provide such pictures, a lenticular lens is bonded to a piece of paper on which a pattern of lines is printed. The pattern consists of sets of parallel lines and each parallel set of lines is offset from each other so that the lens shows only one set at a time. If the sets are different, then the viewer sees a different picture at different angles.

It can readily be appreciated that the production of such type of changeable 3D pictures requires expensive photographic processing. In addition, the depth provided in these pictures is not inherently obvious without the use of the lenticular lens.

There is, detailed hereinbelow, a method for generating 3D pictures by computer. This type of generation is substantially less expensive than the known photographic processing type of generation. In addition, the computer generated type of 3D pictures, in accordance with this method provides substantially more precise depth.

In Fig. 1A, there is shown the type of paper presently utilized in photographic processes to provide pictures which change with the angle of viewing. Thus, as shown in Fig. 1A, a lenticular lens 10 is bonded to a piece of paper 12 upon which a pattern of lines 14 are printed. The elements of lens 10 and the line pattern 12 have to be parallel. The spacing of each section 16 of lenticular lens 10 is suitably from about 0.007 to 0.025 inch. Fig. 1B shows the distribution of parallel lines on paper 12. Figs. 1C, 1D and 1E illustrate a viewing of images through a lenticular lens. Thus, let it be assumed that on sheet 12 as shown in Fig. 1E, there are present and offset from each other the line set A as shown in Fig. 1C, and the line set B as shown in Fig. 1D. When line set A is viewed from the angle as shown in Fig. 1E, then the triangle is seen with the apex above the base. However, in the view from point B, as shown in Fig. 1E, the triangle is seen as inverted. Notations 18 on Figs. 1C and 1D indicate the spacing corresponding to the portion of lenticular lens 10, which has been denoted by numeral 16 in Fig. 1A. The notation 20 indicates the offset of the patterns of Figs. 1C and Fig. 1D which is equal to one-half of spacing 18. The distance 22 shown in Fig. 1E is the focal depth of the lenticular lens. The lens, of course, is focused on the plane of sheet 12.

In Fig. 2, there is shown a changeable picture generated by a computer in accordance with a method disclosed herein where a circle of white shifts with changes in viewing angle. The picture depicted in Fig. 2 was produced by a plotter output device of a computer and has several different pictures.

In Figs. 3A-3F, there are shown how changeable 3D pictures can be set up to simulate changes in viewpoint. Thus, for examp...