Browse Prior Art Database

Computer Generation of 3D Holocodings of Imaginary Objects

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000077523D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 3 page(s) / 214K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Appel, A: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In patent 3,515,452 of R.V. Pole and assigned to the IBM Corporation, there is disclosed the technique wherein there is recorded in white light with a fly's eye lens, multiple images of a solid. There is thereby produced a holocoder from which a virtual hologram can be provided. The essential components of the holocoder are the above-mentioned fly's eye lens and a film upon which there is recorded an ordered multiplicity of images of a real object.

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Computer Generation of 3D Holocodings of Imaginary Objects

In patent 3,515,452 of R.V. Pole and assigned to the IBM Corporation, there is disclosed the technique wherein there is recorded in white light with a fly's eye lens, multiple images of a solid. There is thereby produced a holocoder from which a virtual hologram can be provided. The essential components of the holocoder are the above-mentioned fly's eye lens and a film upon which there is recorded an ordered multiplicity of images of a real object.

In accordance with the method disclosed herein, there is provided a holocoder of imaginary objects whereby the images that would normally be recorded photographically, can be calculated and drawn under computer control. Such computer-generated holocoder can be employed to produce a hologram as described in the above-mentioned patent. Alternatively, the holocoder can be viewed directly through the fly's eye lens.

To create the holocoder of the imaginary object, there has to be calculated the shifting of the position of the viewpoint for each lens element. In Fig. 1A, there is shown the object 10 as it is oriented relative to the XYZ coordinate axes. The line 12 indicates the nominal direction of view for the fly's eye lens 14 as a whole. The dots generally designated by the numeral 16 illustrate typical viewing positions, structure 18 representing the lens array. The distance 20 is the lens element to lens element spacing. Lens array 18 is located a nominal distance from the origin. The angles, theta and phi and the radius are parameters for the perspective view generation program.

In Fig. 1A, by setting the lens assembly perpendicular to this nominal direction of view, the location in space of each lens center can be calculated and then the perspective drawing of the imaginary object is computer generated as it would be viewed from each lens can be calculated and then the perspective drawing of the imaginary object is computer generated as it would be viewed from each lens center. The individual pictures are drawn properly aligned with a digital plotter. The actual plot can usually be 10 or 20 times oversize and the hard copy can thereafter be photographically reduced to the final size. Well known programs such as LEGER and SIGHT enable the rendering of these pictures with hidden lines removed or with shading or color. Fig. 1B is a view similar to that of Fig. 1A wherein there is also shown the radius parameter. Thus, in this structure, the lens (IJ), the radius I,J and the angles theta(I,J) and phi(I,J) are shown.

In carrying out the methods disclosed herein, there is suitably utilized a fly's eye lens of size of 4'' x 5'' with a lens spacing of 10 lens elements to the inch. 2,000 pictur...