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Photoconductor for Electrical Testing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000077547D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 74K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Greene, KF: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

The drawing shows a circuit device that simplifies the problems of electrically contacting test points on the device during electrical testing. Fig. 1 illustrates an arrangement for testing a conductor 2 that is formed between conductive studs 3 and 4. Studs 3 and 4 are small and are positioned close to other studs shown in the drawing. A region of photoconductive material 5 forms a circuit path from stud 3 to a power terminal 6. Similarly, a region of photoconductive material 7 forms a path to a power terminal 8. Terminals 6 and 8 are larger than the studs and are more Widely spaced and can be more easily contacted by test equipment. Regions 5 and 7 are illuminated during testing to form the special test circuit.

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Photoconductor for Electrical Testing

The drawing shows a circuit device that simplifies the problems of electrically contacting test points on the device during electrical testing. Fig. 1 illustrates an arrangement for testing a conductor 2 that is formed between conductive studs 3 and 4. Studs 3 and 4 are small and are positioned close to other studs shown in the drawing. A region of photoconductive material 5 forms a circuit path from stud 3 to a power terminal 6. Similarly, a region of photoconductive material 7 forms a path to a power terminal 8. Terminals 6 and 8 are larger than the studs and are more Widely spaced and can be more easily contacted by test equipment. Regions 5 and 7 are illuminated during testing to form the special test circuit. In ordinary operation of the circuit device, regions 5 and 7 are not illuminated and terminals 6 and 8 are isolated from studs 3 and 4.

The special circuit paths for testing can be formed in several advantageous ways. In the example of Fig. 1, discrete circuit paths are formed. Similarly, the entire surface can be coated with photoelectric material and only desired circuit paths made conductive by illuminating appropriate regions.

The test circuit can be formed in part of a conductive metal pattern with discontinuities, at which the photoconductive material forms a light-responsive switch. Fig. 2 shows an improvement on this concept that uses a more generalized conductor pattern, and also reduces the possibility tha...