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Improving Insulation Resistance of Dielectrics

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000077582D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Washo, BD: AUTHOR

Abstract

It has been known that due to moisture absorption, insulation resistance of dielectrics can degrade from a high value to a low value or even assume a low value upon initial processing of the material. The present procedure eliminates this deterioration phenomenon as follows:

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Improving Insulation Resistance of Dielectrics

It has been known that due to moisture absorption, insulation resistance of dielectrics can degrade from a high value to a low value or even assume a low value upon initial processing of the material. The present procedure eliminates this deterioration phenomenon as follows:

1) The dielectric material (e.g. epoxy resin plus amine hardener) is subjected to a thermal bake cycle (100 degrees C. or higher) under vacuum conditions (approximately one torr is satisfactory) in a vacuum oven. The cycle duration is several hours depending upon the bake temperature. This baking serves to drive off essentially all of the absorbed moisture.

2) With temperature and vacuum conditions held constant, the removed moisture is replaced by silicone/reactive silicone (silane) vapors introduced into the vacuum oven at the temperature of the system. The vapors are permitted to diffuse into and be absorbed by the problem material; over a period of several hours which again depends upon the temperature of the treatment.

3) The oven is thereafter opened and the now inoculated material is "quenched" to room temperature with an air gun. The quenching step condenses and "fixes" the silicone in the matrix of the problem material. Since the electrical conductivity of the silicone is low, the inoculated dielectric possesses low-electrical conductivity or, conversely, high-insulation resistance. The presence of the absorbed silicones also act as a na...