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Reducing Divergence of Cross Field Lasers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000077586D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 36K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hodgson, RT: AUTHOR

Abstract

This device employs a series of Parallel plates w thin a gas chamber, exposed to an electrical field, for producing a laser output whose divergence is less than that which would exist in the absence of such plates. When no output mirror is used in a laser cavity employing a gas, the divergence of that output beam is governed by the physical dimensions of the discharge chamber. Thus, in the figure, the electrodes 2 and 4 are immersed in a gas, housed in chamber 6, and current i through said electrodes will produce a light output L, having a divergence theta. However, when parallel metal strips 8 are inserted in the chamber, the divergence is diminished in the following manner.

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Reducing Divergence of Cross Field Lasers

This device employs a series of Parallel plates w thin a gas chamber, exposed to an electrical field, for producing a laser output whose divergence is less than that which would exist in the absence of such plates. When no output mirror is used in a laser cavity employing a gas, the divergence of that output beam is governed by the physical dimensions of the discharge chamber. Thus, in the figure, the electrodes 2 and 4 are immersed in a gas, housed in chamber 6, and current i through said electrodes will produce a light output L, having a divergence theta. However, when parallel metal strips 8 are inserted in the chamber, the divergence is diminished in the following manner.

Since the metal strips are inserted in the discharge tube formed by the electrodes 2 and 4 parallel to the latter as well as to the direction of the light output and perpendicular to the current, such metal strips capacitively divide a voltage applied to such electrodes. As a result of such voltage pulse, the gas between the metal strips breaks down in a normal manner. The electric field is not significantly different from that in the normal device, and the only effect that the strips have on the electrical discharge characteristics is to make the latter more uniformly distributed in space. However, spontaneous emission from an excited molecule that would be amplified and normally lost to the electrode walls or contribute to the high divergence is bl...