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Mechanism for Printing Concentric Circles for Use as Coded Indicia

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000077594D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Johnson, RA: AUTHOR

Abstract

Concentric circles for use as coded indicia have been proposed for encoding labels and other devices sold in retail outlets, such as supermarkets and department stores. The preparation of these labels on a mass basis proposes no significant problem. However, it is extremely desirable to provide printing facilities on a limited basis at the store level for preparing labels for unusually shaped merchandise or merchandise not previously marked, or alternatively for replacing mutilated labels on packages which have been damaged. While concentric circle codes are extremely easy to read, they are difficult to print. When variable formats are required, the most obvious way to print the code is by the use of fixed type slugs. This is entirely satisfactory when the information content is not subject to change.

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Mechanism for Printing Concentric Circles for Use as Coded Indicia

Concentric circles for use as coded indicia have been proposed for encoding labels and other devices sold in retail outlets, such as supermarkets and department stores. The preparation of these labels on a mass basis proposes no significant problem. However, it is extremely desirable to provide printing facilities on a limited basis at the store level for preparing labels for unusually shaped merchandise or merchandise not previously marked, or alternatively for replacing mutilated labels on packages which have been damaged. While concentric circle codes are extremely easy to read, they are difficult to print. When variable formats are required, the most obvious way to print the code is by the use of fixed type slugs. This is entirely satisfactory when the information content is not subject to change. Lithographic and photographic techniques using hand drawn or machine generated masters are quite suitable for producing large quantities. However, they are entirely unsuitable for limited quantity printing, since the technique requires substantial numbers of discrete type elements.

Described is a means of printing labels containing variable information under control of a minicomputer using a rotating ink jet.

In the drawing, an ink jet is mounted on a shaft which ,s arranged for rotation by a stepping motor, which is under control of a minicomputer, not shown. The computer also controls a valve which regulates the flow of ink to the jet. By suitable programming, the computer can control the ink flow and shaft rotation so as to print ...