Browse Prior Art Database

Flat Isolator Conductor Structure

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000077632D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Rogalla, D: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Isolator conductor structures with a flat surface are useful in electrical devices, if the surface of the completed device is preferably flat and the thickness of the whole device has to be kept small. The structure is produced by depositing two metal layers on an isolator structure and by removing the metal extending beyond the isolator structure.

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Flat Isolator Conductor Structure

Isolator conductor structures with a flat surface are useful in electrical devices, if the surface of the completed device is preferably flat and the thickness of the whole device has to be kept small. The structure is produced by depositing two metal layers on an isolator structure and by removing the metal extending beyond the isolator structure.

Starting with an isolator structure 2 covering substrate 1 and comprising an etching pattern corresponding to the required conductor pattern (see A in the figure), a copper layer 3 and a thin aluminum layer 4 are successively vapor deposited on the isolator structure B, where the combined thickness of the metal layers equals that of the isolator material. By conventional photolithographic methods, the metal layers are masked with photoresist 5 in the areas corresponding to the required conductor pattern C. The exposed metallized areas are subsequently etched, first with an aluminum solving agent and then with a copper solving agent. After the photoresist (D) has been stripped off, the structure is ready for the consecutive process step, such as the application of a passivation layer (E). An overlaying passivation layer can be kept very thin (<0.5 mu), since the flat structure does not entail any edge coverage problems.

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