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Removing Chemically Resistant Dielectric Coating for an Integrated Circuit Module

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000077666D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 46K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gregor, LV: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Certain polymer integrated circuit interconnection packages employ plated circuitry, which is initially deposited on a planar fixture surface and defined by a dielectric coating. The plated circuitry is then conveyed to a polymer plastic substrate during a transfer molding operation.

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Removing Chemically Resistant Dielectric Coating for an Integrated Circuit Module

Certain polymer integrated circuit interconnection packages employ plated circuitry, which is initially deposited on a planar fixture surface and defined by a dielectric coating. The plated circuitry is then conveyed to a polymer plastic substrate during a transfer molding operation.

One suitable dielectric coating used to define the circuit pattern comprises a fluorinated hydrocarbon, which possesses the desired dielectric and wear resistance properties. However, conventional chemical etches, solvents, etc. are not suitable for selectively removing the dielectric coating in order to define the desired circuit pattern on the fixture surface.

The following sequence of steps, designated in Figs. 1-6, provide a process which removes the fluorocarbon by bombardment with O(2) plasma so as to cause decomposition of the organic polymer and cleavage of the molecular structure. In Fig. 1, the dielectric coating 10 is deposited on the stainless steel fixture 12. Next, a copper layer 14 is deposited over the polymer layer 10. In Fig. 3, selective etching is used to define an interconnection pattern 16. Then, the structure of Fig. 4 is bombarded with a high energy O(2) plasma so as to remove the dielectric coating in the plurality of openings defined in the metallization layer 16. The resulting structure is illustrated in Fig. 5. Finally, the copper film 16 used to mask the polymer surface is r...