Browse Prior Art Database

Short Term Memory Normalization

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000077781D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 24K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Criscimagna, TN: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In gaseous display and memory apparatus, several basic problems are encountered which tend to limit the utility of the apparatus. The first problem is the nonuniform aging of cells due to the variable history of a cell within a character matrix, resulting in variation of operating potential from cell-to-cell. A second difficulty is to erase an old character or display and immediately write a new one in the same or an adjacent location, without having some of the cells previously lit from the old display reignite. A method of exercising all cells to eliminate the nonuniform aging problem and thereby extend panel life operates as follows.

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Short Term Memory Normalization

In gaseous display and memory apparatus, several basic problems are encountered which tend to limit the utility of the apparatus. The first problem is the nonuniform aging of cells due to the variable history of a cell within a character matrix, resulting in variation of operating potential from cell-to-cell. A second difficulty is to erase an old character or display and immediately write a new one in the same or an adjacent location, without having some of the cells previously lit from the old display reignite. A method of exercising all cells to eliminate the nonuniform aging problem and thereby extend panel life operates as follows.

To replace or write a new character within a character slot such as the 5x7 cell matrix illustrated in the drawings, all 35 cells comprising the character matrix are fired, as shown in Fig. 1, either after an erase of the previous character or in lieu of an erase. When all of the character cells have been fired as shown in Fig. 1, a character such as the character "B", shown in Fig. 2, can be generated by either selectively erasing the nonselected cells, or by a complete erase of all cells in the character matrix followed by the normal write operation. The alternative selected is a matter of design choice determined by the control logic and drive circuitry used in the panel. In the selective erase operation, the character block matrix is fired as in Fig. 1 and the negative image of the desired chara...