Browse Prior Art Database

Two Mirror Copier Scanner

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000077822D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 50K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Portig, H: AUTHOR

Abstract

This scanning mechanism facilitates building a copier with image size reduction capabilities. The system fits naturally into a copier which has a scanning illumination system.

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Two Mirror Copier Scanner

This scanning mechanism facilitates building a copier with image size reduction capabilities. The system fits naturally into a copier which has a scanning illumination system.

The mechanism Fig. 1 consists of a document glass 1, an illumination system, not shown, one mirror 2 that moves at scanning speed, one mirror 3 that moves at half-scanning speed, a stationary lens 4, and two

The mechanism lends itself to a reducing copier, since the components that scan do not have to be readjusted in configuration when changing from a nonreduction to a reduction mode. However, the speed of scan has to change. When changing to a reduction mode, lens 4 and the two stationary s 5 and 6 are moved to new positions, but these parts do not move during scanning. Typical conjugate lengths involved are: for 1:1, 41.4 inches; for 11:17, 43.42 inches.

Advantages include: 1) Components moving during scan only need to change scan speed for reduction, but not configuration. 2) Components which are relocated for reduction mode do not participate in scanning. his simplifies the mechanical design of the system. 3) One of the canning mirrors can be attached to the illumination carriage, not shown, the other mirror being driven off the illumination carriage at half speed, thus avoiding two independently driven carriages (e.g. illumination and lens), and, 4) For any degree of reduction, the image is on the photoconductor drum in the same angular position as measured f...