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Direct Copper Additive Circuitry Process

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000077863D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Angelo, RW: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This is an improved process for metallizing flexible insulating surfaces, which comprises printing a circuit pattern, preferably with a silver or gold particle filled ink, that normally is nonconductive, and to convert the printed pattern into a conductive circuit in a conventional copper electroless bath. The silver or gold metallic particles are encapsulated by the organic binder phase of the ink. Sufficient nucleating silver or gold surface to initiate electroless copper deposition can be uncovered, by the use of an activated gas developed in a low-temperature Asher or by dipping the printed-circuit pattern in a caustic solution of pH 12 for approximately one minute. The result of either treatment is to expose a greater metal surface and, therefore, increase the nucleation density and the initial electroless deposition rate.

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Direct Copper Additive Circuitry Process

This is an improved process for metallizing flexible insulating surfaces, which comprises printing a circuit pattern, preferably with a silver or gold particle filled ink, that normally is nonconductive, and to convert the printed pattern into a conductive circuit in a conventional copper electroless bath. The silver or gold metallic particles are encapsulated by the organic binder phase of the ink. Sufficient nucleating silver or gold surface to initiate electroless copper deposition can be uncovered, by the use of an activated gas developed in a low- temperature Asher or by dipping the printed-circuit pattern in a caustic solution of pH 12 for approximately one minute. The result of either treatment is to expose a greater metal surface and, therefore, increase the nucleation density and the initial electroless deposition rate.

This direct positive process is characterized in that it has fewer steps, and also eliminates the critical and difficult to control sensitization and activation steps conventionally used.

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