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Electrophoretic Wire Coating

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000077881D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 48K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cornish, BE: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

An important factor in electrophoretic deposition of insulation on wires is control of deposit thickness. At high-production speeds, in electrophoretic coating media having low viscosity, vibration of the wire presents a problem. Many avoidance techniques give rise to ancillary complications which are unacceptable.

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Electrophoretic Wire Coating

An important factor in electrophoretic deposition of insulation on wires is control of deposit thickness. At high-production speeds, in electrophoretic coating media having low viscosity, vibration of the wire presents a problem. Many avoidance techniques give rise to ancillary complications which are unacceptable.

An acceptable technique for damping wire vibrations is to increase the length 51 (Fig. 1) of coating fluid in the production path, while maintaining a constant electrochemical exposure interval for the wire. For a given wire speed, this interval becomes a function of the length L2 of exposed cathode in the production path. L2 can be varied by interposing plastic shield 1 between cathode 2 and a portion of the immersed anodically poled wire 3. Due to fringe field effects, the effective exposure interval will be greater than L2 although less than L1.

As L1 is increased by adding fluid 6 the effective exposure interval is lengthened; even if L2 is held constant. Adjustment of L2 (e.g. by lowering shield
1) compensates, but not with sufficient sensitivity of control to be considered satisfactory. Sensitivity for such adjustment is improved by interposing 0-ring seal 4 (Fig. 2) between the shield and cathode. This prevents coating fluid 6 from occupying the space between the shield and cathode; thereby eliminating fringe field-current components terminating along the shielded length of the cathode. The 0-ring may be cemented in...