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Impulse Emitter

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000077912D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 25K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Rowe, TH: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This unidirectional emitter produces a discrete pulse for a given angular displacement of its actuator, without regard to minimum operating speed. Fig. A shows a rotatably driven plastic toothed wheel 2 that is driven by moving a printer on paper. Metal spring 4 is mounted on a fixed insulating post 6, the fixed end thereof being formed to produce a bias against conductive strip 8. The opposite end of the spring overlaps the wheel tooth. Conductive strip 8 is coated with a thin dielectric and is rigidly mounted under and parallel to spring 4. The spring and conductive strip form a capacitor C-1 that has a maximum capacitance when the spring tip is clear of the wheel, and a minimum capacitance when the spring tip is on the high point of a tooth.

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Impulse Emitter

This unidirectional emitter produces a discrete pulse for a given angular displacement of its actuator, without regard to minimum operating speed. Fig. A shows a rotatably driven plastic toothed wheel 2 that is driven by moving a printer on paper. Metal spring 4 is mounted on a fixed insulating post 6, the fixed end thereof being formed to produce a bias against conductive strip 8. The opposite end of the spring overlaps the wheel tooth. Conductive strip 8 is coated with a thin dielectric and is rigidly mounted under and parallel to spring 4. The spring and conductive strip form a capacitor C-1 that has a maximum capacitance when the spring tip is clear of the wheel, and a minimum capacitance when the spring tip is on the high point of a tooth. Whenever the spring drops off the high point of the tooth, C-1 changes very rapidly from low to high capacitance due to the high velocity of the spring during free flight. Enhancement MOSFET transistor 10, with its gate connected to strip 8, is mounted directly under and close to strip 8 to reduce stray capacitance. The remaining portion of the circuit board 12 is reserved for other electronic components.

Fig. B shows a basic circuit that will produce the desired output. The enhancement MOSFET transistor is cut off when the gate-to-source voltage is at zero; therefore, there is no output under static conditions. Capacitor C-1, resistor R-1, and the gate of the MOSFET form a very high-input impedance circuit...