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Hot Pressed Sodalite for High Density Memory and Display Applications

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000077970D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chang, IF: AUTHOR

Abstract

A material is made available for use as a high-density memory or display, such material being both photochromic and cathodochromic.

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Hot Pressed Sodalite for High Density Memory and Display Applications

A material is made available for use as a high-density memory or display, such material being both photochromic and cathodochromic.

A powder material-molecular sieve of sodium aluminum silicate, such as a Linde sieve; sodium chloride:sodium sulfide in a weight ratio 12:2:. is well mixed in a blender and the mixture is loaded in a hot press; that is, the pressing piston and cylinder are situated in a furnace having the proper lining material, such as alumina. The temperature is raised gradually to any temperature between 650 degrees C to 1000 degrees C, the pressure being set to 5000 psi. The pressure and temperature are kept constant for 12 to 45 hours depending on the charge amount used. The resultant material is a white solid. The above ratio is not unique, and other weight ratios can be used.

The white solid is cathodochromic. A 20KV electron beam of 10/-7/ amp can make a visible image almost instantly, and permanent images are stored until the material is erased by raising its temperature to 350 degrees C. An image of one micron line resolutions has been written on the hot-pressed solid by a focussed electron beam.

Although the material initially was not photochromic, those areas that were bombarded by an electron beam became photochromic. After thermal erasure, however, the beam written image can be restored by UV light.

The hot-pressed sodalite exhibits a secondary electron emission in a...