Browse Prior Art Database

Rotary Score Unit With Running Blade Adjustment

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000078076D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Maynard, KB: AUTHOR

Abstract

This is a rotary score unit wherein the degree of pinch between a rotated perforating blade and an anvil cylinder can be adjusted while the unit is running, to optimize or discontinue cutting action, despite the fact that both blade cylinder and anvil cylinder have shafts with fixed centers.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 73% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Rotary Score Unit With Running Blade Adjustment

This is a rotary score unit wherein the degree of pinch between a rotated perforating blade and an anvil cylinder can be adjusted while the unit is running, to optimize or discontinue cutting action, despite the fact that both blade cylinder and anvil cylinder have shafts with fixed centers.

A blade 1 (Fig. 1), adjustably inset into a recess 2 in cylinder 3, normally makes pinch-cut contact with an anvil insert 4 (size shown exaggerated) inset into the periphery of anvil cylinder 5. Insert 4 has a radius of curvature 6 that is eccentric to the axis 7 of cylinder 5.

Blade cylinder 3 is rotatably driven from the press gear train, not shown, through a gear 8 (Fig. 2) and fixed center shaft 9. Keyed to shaft 9 is a helical gear 10 that through helical gear 11 and fixed center shaft 12 drives anvil cylinder 5. Gears 10, 11 are of the antibacklash synchronous type. Gear 11 is spline-connected to shaft 12 so as to be shiftable and axially positionable along the shaft. Thus, if while running, gear 11 is shifted rightward, as viewed in Fig. 2, anvil cylinder 5 will be rotatively shifted clockwise, as viewed in Fig. 1, relative to blade 1 and increase the degree of pinch between the blade and anvil insert. Conversely, if while running, gear 11 is shifted leftward, as viewed in Fig. 2, anvil cylinder will be rotatively shifted counterclockwise, as viewed in Fig. 1, and thus shift the anvil insert to a position in which the bla...