Browse Prior Art Database

Wirepack

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000078111D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Berard, AD: AUTHOR

Abstract

The wirepack is a device to improve wirability on a printed-circuit card. It accomplishes this by creating additional printed circuit wiring channels orthogonal to the card surface, while consuming no wiring channels on the card itself.

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Wirepack

The wirepack is a device to improve wirability on a printed-circuit card. It accomplishes this by creating additional printed circuit wiring channels orthogonal to the card surface, while consuming no wiring channels on the card itself.

The wirepack 10 is constructed of two-sided copper, glass epoxy card stock which is etched to form printed-circuit lines along its length. The printed-circuit lines terminate in a row of plated-through holes 11 alone the bottom edge of the wirepack 10. Bent sections of wire 12 are inserted into the wirepack's plated- through holes 11 and soldered. These wire sections form the pins 12, 14-17 which enable the wirepack 10 to be soldered onto a printed-circuit card 13 surface. This form of construction enables the wirepack 10 to be protective coated and assembled as a normal component.

The electrical operation of the wirepack 10 is as follows. If a signal which is generated near the bottom of a card 13 is to be routed to a receiver component near the top of a card, the wirepack is wired (using a card printed-circuit line) to a printed-circuit card through pin 14 or 16 near the signal source at the bottom of the card. The signal enters the wirepack pin, which is soldered into that card's plated-through hole 11, and traverses the length of the wirepack to its exit pin 15 or 17. The exit pin is soldered to a plated-through hole near the top of the card. The signal then travels along card printed-circuit wiring to the receiver co...