Browse Prior Art Database

Flux Applicator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000078123D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 33K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bechard, RR: AUTHOR

Abstract

This applicator relies on air pressure and a brush feed to apply precisely controlled amounts of solder flux for solder bonding an integrated circuit chip to a substrate. Housing 10 has flux chamber 12, air inlet port 14 and flux inlet passage 16. Air cylinder 18 is connected to TEFLON* plastic valve member 20 by rod 22. The other end 24 of valve member 20 blocks flux inlet passageway 16, when in the position shown. Valve member 20 is normally biased in the position shown by spring 26. Flux inlet passageway 16 is connected to flux reservoir 28, which has an air inlet 30. Threaded member 32 screws into the lower end of flux chamber 12. A brush tip 34 is mounted on threaded member 32.

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Flux Applicator

This applicator relies on air pressure and a brush feed to apply precisely controlled amounts of solder flux for solder bonding an integrated circuit chip to a substrate. Housing 10 has flux chamber 12, air inlet port 14 and flux inlet passage 16. Air cylinder 18 is connected to TEFLON* plastic valve member 20 by rod 22. The other end 24 of valve member 20 blocks flux inlet passageway 16, when in the position shown. Valve member 20 is normally biased in the position shown by spring 26. Flux inlet passageway 16 is connected to flux reservoir 28, which has an air inlet 30. Threaded member 32 screws into the lower end of flux chamber 12. A brush tip 34 is mounted on threaded member
32.

In operation, an air pulse is simultaneously supplied to flux reservoir 28 through air inlet 30 and to air cylinder 18. This moves tip 24 of the plastic valve member 20 to the right away from flux inlet 16, and forces a quantity of flux from reservoir 28 through inlet 16 to flux chamber 12. This air pulse terminates, allowing spring 26 to bias valve member 20 back to the position shown. A second air pulse is then supplied through air inlet port 14 to flux chamber 12, thus pushing a droplet of flux down to brush 34. The flux is then applied from brush 34 to a substrate, prior to solder bonding an integrated circuit chin to the substrate in a known manner. The amount of flux supplied to brush 34 may be varied by changing the pressure of the air pulses, as well as their t...