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Browse Prior Art Database

Wire Holding Device

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000078152D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 38K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Manger, WL: AUTHOR

Abstract

Fig. 1 illustrates a device for securely holding wires in break-out areas of a cable, which secures the wires tightly and preserves accurate spacing of them. Prior devices used include cable lacing and/or break-out strips. Cable lacing is a time consuming hand operation, and the spacing created in the broken out wires is variable and subject to many individual changes. Break-out strips which are commercially available do not secure the wires tightly and impose an additional expense.

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Wire Holding Device

Fig. 1 illustrates a device for securely holding wires in break-out areas of a cable, which secures the wires tightly and preserves accurate spacing of them. Prior devices used include cable lacing and/or break-out strips. Cable lacing is a time consuming hand operation, and the spacing created in the broken out wires is variable and subject to many individual changes. Break-out strips which are commercially available do not secure the wires tightly and impose an additional expense.

In Fig. 1, cable 1, composed of a plurality of wires 2, is shown with the individual wires 2 being held by the holding device. As illustrated in Fig. 2, the holding device consists of a piece of heat shrinkable plastic tubing 3, which has had a number of parallel slits 4 made perpendicular to the axis of the tubing and extending approximately one-half way through the diameter of the tubing. The wires 2 are pushed downward on the area 5 of tubing between two adjacent slits which collapses that portion of the tubing wall (illustrated in Fig. 3A) and a retainer pin 7, which may be of either wire or plastic or any readily available material, is inserted through the end of the tubing across the tops of the wires 2 but under the undepressed portions 6 of shrink tubing 3. As illustrated in Fig. 3B, the retainer 7 and the wires 2 are locked together in a firm assembly when tubing 3 is recovered with the application of heat.

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