Browse Prior Art Database

Dummy Key Implementation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000078155D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Barker, JH: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

For economic reasons, it is desirable, when manufacturing a variety of different keyboards, to use the same keyboard layout having the same number of keys for various applications, even though one or more keys on a given application may be inoperative as the features connected with those keys are not provided in some implementations. As keystems and key modules with their associated key buttons will be inserted in the nonoperative key positions, it is necessary to provide for the key being locked in either the up or down position. This prevents operation of the key and possible creation of error in a keyboard, when the keyboard is not provided with the function associated with the key button.

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Dummy Key Implementation

For economic reasons, it is desirable, when manufacturing a variety of different keyboards, to use the same keyboard layout having the same number of keys for various applications, even though one or more keys on a given application may be inoperative as the features connected with those keys are not provided in some implementations. As keystems and key modules with their associated key buttons will be inserted in the nonoperative key positions, it is necessary to provide for the key being locked in either the up or down position. This prevents operation of the key and possible creation of error in a keyboard, when the keyboard is not provided with the function associated with the key button.

Fig. 1 and the enlarged partial view associated with Fig. 1 illustrate a device for locking a key button in the up position, in which locking collar 1 is inserted around the keystem 2 at assembly. Collar 1 is Placed over keystem 2 when the key module is inserted through the frame. Slots 4 in collar 1 permit the outward extending projections of keystem 2 to pass through the collar 1, since these projections are wider than the central opening in collar 1. Collar 1 is then turned approximately 90 degrees to lock it into position beneath the outward extending projections from keystem 2, thereby holding keystem 2 in a fixed nonoperable up position.

In some applications it is desirable to create the visual appearance that the keystem is locked in the down...