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Heat Sinks

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000078163D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Johnson, AH: AUTHOR

Abstract

Conventionally, heat-sink assemblies are attached to modules or to cards to provide increased heat dissipation capability. In the instance of ceramic type modules, increased heat dissipation is accomplished by brazing to the module a finned part. The heat sink is normally made of difficult to fabricate materials such as molybdenum, and may be made of a plurality of individual pieces to inhibit expansion mismatch problems. The heat sink may comprise a plurality of studs brazed onto the ceramic, or in the stance of epoxy glass, pins may be soldered onto the board, the pins normally being utilized as terminations.

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Heat Sinks

Conventionally, heat-sink assemblies are attached to modules or to cards to provide increased heat dissipation capability.

In the instance of ceramic type modules, increased heat dissipation is accomplished by brazing to the module a finned part. The heat sink is normally made of difficult to fabricate materials such as molybdenum, and may be made of a plurality of individual pieces to inhibit expansion mismatch problems. The heat sink may comprise a plurality of studs brazed onto the ceramic, or in the stance of epoxy glass, pins may be soldered onto the board, the pins normally being utilized as terminations.

An economic heat sink may be provided on either ceramic modules or epoxy glass modules or cards such as the module 10 illustrated in the drawing. Different heat sinks are illustrated, such as the hemispherical heat sinks 11, the rectangular heat sinks 12 or the elongated bars 13. These are only a few of the shapes that may be provided in the manner described below.

The pads to which the heat sinks 11, 12 and 13 may be applied, are easily defined by the same processes as used to fabricate the opposite surface 14 of the module wherein chips or the like 15 and 16 have been bonded. That is, screening, photoetch, etc. are all acceptable processes for laying down various geometry pads on the surface 17 of the module 10. The surface then may be dip soldered, leaving a projection whose shape is determined by surface tension and pad geometry. Of course,...