Browse Prior Art Database

Analog To Digital Converter With Noise Rejection

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000078198D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Schulz, RA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Analog-to-digital converters are normally adversely affected when placed in an environment with other electronic systems, such as a digital computer. The noise levels produced may be very high and completely overcome the precision and accuracy capability of the analog-to-digital converter.

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Analog To Digital Converter With Noise Rejection

Analog-to-digital converters are normally adversely affected when placed in an environment with other electronic systems, such as a digital computer. The noise levels produced may be very high and completely overcome the precision and accuracy capability of the analog-to-digital converter.

Two well-known A-to-D converter systems are the successive approximation converter and the tracking converter.

The successive approximation converter compares a digitally reconstructed analog signal against an unknown input analog signal. The conversion is serial and under noise-free conditions, the correct balance within the resolution of the converter will be achieved at the end of the process. The digital number generated can be read out as the equivalent of the analog input. If noise causes a comparison error to be made during the process, the successive approximation converter will produce an error which cannot be corrected in later conversion steps.

Tracking converters, normally used where there is a single slow-moving input, employs an up-down counter which stores the digital output and generates the digitally reconstructed analog signal. Periodically, the unknown analog signal input is compared to the digitally reconstructed analog signal and the counter is either increased or decreased by one count. Eventually the counter will be stepped to the correct value, and the error polarity will maintain a null condition.

The dra...