Browse Prior Art Database

High-Speed Forms Stacker

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000078230D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lee, HC: AUTHOR

Abstract

Stacking of continuous forms is facilitated by slowing, stopping or reversing the paper drive at the time the prefold reaches the stack, so as to reduce the outward momentum of the paper.

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High-Speed Forms Stacker

Stacking of continuous forms is facilitated by slowing, stopping or reversing the paper drive at the time the prefold reaches the stack, so as to reduce the outward momentum of the paper.

The drive must accelerate and decelerate the paper in synchronism with the stacking, decelerating the paper near the time the prefold nears the stack. One way of accomplishing this is with a mechanical linkage, as shown in Fig. 1, wherein the tractor T is driven from a pulley P2, which is connected to a larger drive pulley Pl by a bar B. With typical dimensions R1 = 3.5 in. R2 = 0.875 in., A = 0.512 in. and B = 3.328 in., the speed varies as shown by the curve in Fig. 2 which illustrates the cyclic velocity variation of the paper. More typically, similar variations in speed would be achieved by electromechanical drives such as stepper motors, DC servomotors, etc.

Another way of sychronizing variations in the paper velocity with the folds is to detect marks on the paper, as shown in Fig. 3 where paper flows at random rates, and a mark sensor D senses marks on the paper and automatically regulates the timing of pulsations in the paper drive in synchronism with the stacking.

The paper flows at random rates and increases the loop length. When the loop triggers the loop sensor L the stacking cycle is initiated and completes a single cycle, or as many cycles as are necessary to bring the loop out of the loop-sensor range.

It is essential that the distance S1 r...