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Cutter For Shortening Integrated Circuit Socket Leads

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000078237D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Long, EE: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This cutter, for shortening the electric leads 6 if an integrated circuit socket 8 conveniently, safely, and quickly is inexpensively fabricated.

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Cutter For Shortening Integrated Circuit Socket Leads

This cutter, for shortening the electric leads 6 if an integrated circuit socket 8 conveniently, safely, and quickly is inexpensively fabricated.

The principle components of the assembly are a cutting plate 12 and a shearing bar 14, both made of oil hardened steel which will retain along two sides so that it readily may be placed between the jaws 16, 18, of a vise for use. The cutting plate 12 has a number of holes 20 drilled through it, to accommodate individually the electric leads 6 to be cut. For most sockets, a number 62 drill is used. The holes are countersunk at the upper end to facilitate insertion of the leads. Between the holes 20 two bores are arranged to hold springs 24 and 26, which tend to eject the socket 8 away from the plate 12 for easier removal. A central bore is arranged in the plate 12 for accepting a shoulder screw 28, which is screwed into a complementary bore 29 in the bar 14 shown in the inset. The hole in the plate 12 acts as a bearing and a spring 30 is arranged to urge the plate 12 snugly against the bar 14.

The bar 14 has an aperture 32, shown in the inset, beneath the holes 20. opposite sides of this aperture lay on angles of approximately five degrees with the center lines of the rows of holes. The narrow end of the aperture is wide enough to accept all of the leads 6 of the socket 8. This angle at which the cutting blades are arranged allows the cutting action to shear the leads...