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Pulse Powered Voltage Driver Circuit

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000078256D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 38K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cassidy, BM: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

The circuit shown in the figure is arranged so that a voltage at the output is beta independent, and can be actively discharged when standby status is indicated by the input pulses, thus saving power and cycle time. This also permits the output to reach both the voltage and temperature status of other circuits that may be associated therewith.

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Pulse Powered Voltage Driver Circuit

The circuit shown in the figure is arranged so that a voltage at the output is beta independent, and can be actively discharged when standby status is indicated by the input pulses, thus saving power and cycle time. This also permits the output to reach both the voltage and temperature status of other circuits that may be associated therewith.

This circuit can be used to pulse power a memory array and operates as follows: when both inputs 10 and 11 are in standby (row select and column select signals), neither diode D1 or D2 conducts current and transistors T1 and T2 are kept on by a current supplied through resistors R1 and R2, respectively, from the +1.25V supply and the output 12 is off. When both input signals come on at -2.7 volt, the bases of transistors T1 and T2 are held down, the circuit turns on and the output 12 rises. If just one of the input signals at inputs 10 or 11 is held low, then only one of the transistors T1 or T2 is held off; but, since the other transistor is still on, the output 12 remains off.

More specifically, when both input signals are negative, transistors T1 and T2 are both off causing the anodes of diodes D3 and D4 to rise. The voltage at the anode of D3 controls the powering up of the output 12, while the anode voltage of D4 controls the discharge of the output 12. When transistors T1 and T2 are in an off condition, the voltage at the base of T4 rises to a voltage slightly below 4.6 volts, dete...