Browse Prior Art Database

Latching Mechanism

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000078265D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 3 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Garwin, RL: AUTHOR

Abstract

A mechanism has been devised for improving the operation of an antidieseling solenoid that is used to maintain the throttle plate in the closed position, when the ignition is turned off.

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Latching Mechanism

A mechanism has been devised for improving the operation of an antidieseling solenoid that is used to maintain the throttle plate in the closed position, when the ignition is turned off.

In a conventional antidieseling solenoid, when the ignition is off, the solenoid is at its rest position, whereby the throttle plate inside the carburetor is entirely closed and the engine stopped. Upon turning on the ignition to start the car, the solenoid is made to move by a magnetic field created by battery-drawn current passing through a coil of the solenoid, to urge the latter away from its closed position and thus open the throttle plate inside the carburetor.

A conventional antidieseling system is illustrated in Fig. 1. An accelerator pedal, not shown, is connected via a throttle rod 4 to a throttle control cam 6 which carries a throttle plate inside the car's carburetor. The control cam is pivoted on axle 8 so that when the driver's foot is released from the accelerator pedal, a return spring, not shown, forces the throttle cam opposite to the direction of the arrow so that the cam is urged against solenoid plunger 10.

The antidieseling solenoid proper is contained in a soft iron case 12 and is secured to carburetor frame 14 by threading on case 12 and lock nut 16. The solenoid has two leads 18 and 20 which, when the ignition switch is on, provides battery voltage to solenoid coil 22. When battery voltage is not applied, plunger 10 can be readily moved to the left by the throttle restoring spring so that the throttle cam 6 rests against stationary stop 24, in which position the carburetor is entirely closed, whether or not the latter is prone to dieseling.

However, when the driver first depresses the accelerator pedal and turns on the ignition, the solenoid plunger 10, which is made of soft iron, is normally pulled to the right by the magnetic field produced by the battery-energized coil 22; but the plunger will sometimes stick, requiring larger than normal currents to be drawn from the battery to gene...