Browse Prior Art Database

High Density Evaporator Apparatus

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000078375D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 122K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Magee, RA: AUTHOR

Abstract

Screening as the method employed for fabricating circuits on the surface of a substrate from the device to the input-output terminals, has reached a practical limit in terms of line width and spacing. Alternatively, conventional evaporator tooling, as applied to semiconductor device manufacture, comprises conventionally spherical domes or flat planetary type systems in which the tool is loaded manually, and because of the cylindrical geometry of the wafer, individual part retention consumes considerable dome real estate decreasing throughput through the evaporator cycle.

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High Density Evaporator Apparatus

Screening as the method employed for fabricating circuits on the surface of a substrate from the device to the input-output terminals, has reached a practical limit in terms of line width and spacing. Alternatively, conventional evaporator tooling, as applied to semiconductor device manufacture, comprises conventionally spherical domes or flat planetary type systems in which the tool is loaded manually, and because of the cylindrical geometry of the wafer, individual part retention consumes considerable dome real estate decreasing throughput through the evaporator cycle.

In the photographs, a conventional dome evaporator head is illustrated therein, the dome including concave dish structures 11, 12 and 13 each of which operates in a conventional well-known manner. Each of the concave dishes has been modified by placing therein a plurality of concave tracks 14, having upstanding marginal edge portions 15 and 16, extending axially of the track. At one terminal end of the track is an upstanding lip 17. At the opposite end of each track is a catch 18 which has a lip portion 19 which is recessed through a cutout 20 in one end of the track, so as to permit loading therein of ceramic or the like substrates 21, having a pattern thereon upon which metal is to be evaporated. After insertion of the substrates into the track, the catch is elevated and clamps the substrates in the track, the substrates being retained therein by the "keystone"...