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Rotary Consecutive Punch Unit

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000078396D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 48K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Nielsen, O: AUTHOR

Abstract

A ratchet or other type of drive that increments a shaft in only one rotative direction, can set up interposers for code hole punching in ascending or descending consecutive order.

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Rotary Consecutive Punch Unit

A ratchet or other type of drive that increments a shaft in only one rotative direction, can set up interposers for code hole punching in ascending or descending consecutive order.

Units numbering wheel shaft 11 is incremented counterclockwise, as viewed in Fig. 1, during etch punch cycle; end tens numbering wheel shaft 12 is incremented counterclockwise every tenth cycle, in conventional manner. Shafts 11, 12 have sets of semicircular buttons 13 that are adapted to engage an actuator 14 and shift it against the bias of spring 15, to cause the actuator to latch under shoulder 16 in housing 17. When the actuator 14 is thus latched (as shown in the left-hand part of Fig. 1), a solid driving connection is established;
i.e., interposer 18 projects from the housing and is solidly backed up via actuator 14 and shoulder 16, and hence is effective to drive a punch member, not shown, to punching position. However, when an actuator 14 (such as the right-hand actuator in Fig. 1) is not latched, the interposer 18 will not be driven to punching position. The unit has many numbering wheel shafts, although only 11, 12 are shown and described. The interposers 18 are of varying length, because the various numbering wheel shafts are disposed staggered at progressively greater distances from the center of rotation of housing 17.

Each numbering wheel shaft, such as 11, 12, has twenty punch buttons arranged in two sets of 0-9. The buttons 13 (Fig. 2) of...