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Chemical Vapor Deposition by Projected Ultraviolet Patterns

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000078402D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cuomo, JJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Conventional techniques for fabricating patterned metallic or semiconductor thin films generally follow one of two basic approaches. In one approach, a blanket coating of the desired thin-film material is deposited, and thereafter unwanted regions of the material are removed by various photoresist etching techniques. In the other approach, the desired pattern of thin-film material is deposited directly on specified areas of the substrate, via projection or masking techniques. However, the first approach entails many processing steps, while the second approach does not provide good line definition.

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Chemical Vapor Deposition by Projected Ultraviolet Patterns

Conventional techniques for fabricating patterned metallic or semiconductor thin films generally follow one of two basic approaches. In one approach, a blanket coating of the desired thin-film material is deposited, and thereafter unwanted regions of the material are removed by various photoresist etching techniques. In the other approach, the desired pattern of thin-film material is deposited directly on specified areas of the substrate, via projection or masking techniques. However, the first approach entails many processing steps, while the second approach does not provide good line definition.

There is described, here, a process which deposits patterned this films by the use of a projected image of ultraviolet radiation. It is known that most metal and semiconductor compounds (such as halides, carbonyls, acetylacetonates, etc.) which have a high-vapor pressure (if they are solids) or exist as gases at room temperature, can be electronically excited to their chemically active singlet states by being bombarded with ultraviolet radiation. In this excited state the active species will decompose, in the presence of a reducing gas, upon hitting a substrate surface, so as to thereby leave behind the desired metal or semiconductor material.

It has been found, that upon projecting a pattern of ultraviolet radiation on a glass substrate in the presence of tungsten hexacarbonyl (W(CO(2))(6)) or tungsten hexaflu...