Browse Prior Art Database

Optical Switching in GaN Si Switching and Memory Devices

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000078415D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 28K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Agusta, B: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

As shown in Fig. 1, a GaN thin film deposited on silicon has been observed to have two stable resistance states, suitable for memory and switching device applications. The nonvolatile I-V bistable switching characteristics are shown in Fig. 2.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 67% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Optical Switching in GaN Si Switching and Memory Devices

As shown in Fig. 1, a GaN thin film deposited on silicon has been observed to have two stable resistance states, suitable for memory and switching device applications. The nonvolatile I-V bistable switching characteristics are shown in Fig. 2.

Typically, such devices may be switched between the high and low- resistance states by either unipolar or bipolar pulses. For example, in the third quadrant (i.e., negative potential on the silicon), the de device may be switched back and forth between the high-resistance state and the low-resistance state by a succession of negative going pulses. In the high-resistance state, the total resistance is R = Rho L/A. Thus, for a 1 mil(2) area, 1000 Angstroms GaN film with a resistivity equal to 10/5/ Omega cm, the resistance would equal 1.6 x 10(5) Omega. In the low-impedance state, a micro-filament channel or channels determine its resistance, usually of the order of several hundred ohms.

An optical switching phenomenon has been observed in the GaN-Si bistable switch and memory device. When the device is biased in the third quadrant and in the high-impedance state, the device can be triggered to switch to the low- impedance state, as shown in Fig. 2. Switching is achieved by exposing the device to broad, long wavelength UV light rays. This optical switching occurs with a biasing voltage, which ranges between a value slightly smaller than the electrical threshold voltage...