Browse Prior Art Database

Fixed Center Tolerance Interference Compensator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000078487D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 31K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Beck, JL: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A carriage 1 moving on parallel rods 2 is used to transport an attached scan head, not shown, in a reciprocating motion parallel to document plane 3. Due to limited scanner depth of field, extremely tight tolerances are required to maintain vertical location of the scanner. Bearings 4 and 5 transporting the carriage have minimal clearances, which do not permit adequate clearance for straightness tolerances in the rods and the fixed center tolerances in the horizontal plane.

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Fixed Center Tolerance Interference Compensator

A carriage 1 moving on parallel rods 2 is used to transport an attached scan head, not shown, in a reciprocating motion parallel to document plane 3. Due to limited scanner depth of field, extremely tight tolerances are required to maintain vertical location of the scanner. Bearings 4 and 5 transporting the carriage have minimal clearances, which do not permit adequate clearance for straightness tolerances in the rods and the fixed center tolerances in the horizontal plane.

In order to overcome uncontrolled loading of the bearings, that portion of the carriage which houses bearing 5 is connected to the main carriage by cantilever spring 6. By selecting the proper cantilever spring, the bearing load on the ball bushings caused by interference tolerances can be limited to a specific design value. The cantilever spring provides a desired load and flexibility in the horizontal direction, while its column strength produces a desired dimensional control in the vertical direction. Simple cantilever beam theory shows that a decrease in spring length due to small horizontal deflections is insignificant. Therefore, small deflections do not affect vertical dimensional stability.

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