Browse Prior Art Database

Recording Media Employing Particulate Amorphous Materials

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000078501D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

O'Brien, HA: AUTHOR

Abstract

Recording information on, and reading information from, continuous amorphous film media by the application of electromagnetic radiation is described, for example, in U. S. Patent 3,636,526. Deposition of large continuous films of amorphous material for use as such media presents many technical difficulties. These difficulties are avoided by utilizing amorphous material in particulate form, rather than in continuous film form.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Recording Media Employing Particulate Amorphous Materials

Recording information on, and reading information from, continuous amorphous film media by the application of electromagnetic radiation is described, for example, in U. S. Patent 3,636,526. Deposition of large continuous films of amorphous material for use as such media presents many technical difficulties. These difficulties are avoided by utilizing amorphous material in particulate form, rather than in continuous film form.

Particulate amorphous material for use in media, is either produced or ground to a size equal to or smaller than the wavelength of electromagnetic radiation used in reading and writing operations. The particles are dispersed in a binder which has a refractive index that closely matches the refractive index of the amorphous particles and the dispersion is coated on a substrate. The active surface of the medium is produced as nearly optically smooth as possible. Optical smoothness of the active surface is obtained, for example, by calendering the dispersion before it is completely cured or dried, by coating the dispersion on an optically smooth surface and then removing the coating to reveal the smooth transfer surface for use as the active surface, or by coating the dispersion on an optically smooth transparent substrate and reading and writing through the transparent substrate.

1