Browse Prior Art Database

Input Program Generator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000078647D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cook, PW: AUTHOR

Abstract

IPG (Input Program Generator) is a program to generate FORTRAN-IV input programs. From an external point of view, it accepts a description of an input structure and produces the code to implement that structure. The types of input systems generated by IPG are characterized by allowing free formal input, and specific parameter identification by arbitrary, user specified, chains of one or more keywords. Thus, the user may specify the "syntax" of his input system by a chain of keywords, followed by a list of one or more variable assignments to be made in response to each chain.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 72% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Input Program Generator

IPG (Input Program Generator) is a program to generate FORTRAN-IV input programs. From an external point of view, it accepts a description of an input structure and produces the code to implement that structure. The types of input systems generated by IPG are characterized by allowing free formal input, and specific parameter identification by arbitrary, user specified, chains of one or more keywords. Thus, the user may specify the "syntax" of his input system by a chain of keywords, followed by a list of one or more variable assignments to be made in response to each chain.

Internally, the core of IPG is the means by which syntax of the generated system is stored and processed. Conceptually, the syntax may be represented as a tree structure. Any node of the tree corresponds to a partially processed key word chain, and has branches corresponding to each valid next key word. Terminal nodes, corresponding to fully processed key word chains point to assignment lists, which specify the actions to be taken as a result of the key words.

The actual implementation in IPG is by multiply linked data cells, each cell containing one key word. Cells are linked "vertically" to further key words (or assignment lists) and "horizontally" to other possible key words occurring at the same level. Thus, a group of horizontally linked cells corresponds to one node of the tree used to represent the syntax, and contains, in its cells, all possible legal keywords...